Category: The World Around Us

After the millennials, is the wienie generation next?

Yes, the earth is still flat for college administrators and some students

By now, most of us have heard about how the University of California – Berkley spent $600,000 for security when conservative speaker Ben Shapiro spoke to students at the school. Heck, for $600,000 I would think Cal could have hired the 101st Airborne to provide security for Shapiro. Shapiro is a conservative commentator, columnist, author,  radio talk show host and lawyer. He is no right wing crazy or neo-Nazi. He graduated from high school at age 16, graduated from UCLA summa cum laude and was a Phi Beta Kappa member. At age 20 he graduated with honors from Harvard Law School. If it weren’t bad enough for Cal to spend $600,000 on security for Shapiro’s appearance, the officials at Cal provided counselors for students who might be upset about him making a speech on campus. The “wienie generation” is on the heels of the millennials.

After the state flag, what’s next?

As I’ve written previously, if and when our state flag is changed, what’s next? The list is long. Recently the Jackson Public School District decided to consider changing the names of three schools in the city. The schools are named after Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and James Z. George. George was a colonel in the Confederate States Army and later served as a U.S. Senator from Mississippi until his death. Yes, the JPS system is the second largest in the state and is over 95 percent black. There is a very real possibility that the school district could be taken over by the state because of the many failings of Jackson schools. Let’s face it. Jackson Public Schools are rotten. I have often wondered how many

Continue reading

Fear The Tree!

Or, attend Stanford and find your inner weirdness

A number of years ago, I attended a men’s NCAA basketball regional in Charlotte, NC. In the opening game, Mississippi State defeated Stanford before losing in the regional finals to Duke which had beaten North Carolina in its opening game. One of my sons and I cracked up laughing at the Stanford mascot, a Tree. For those who don’t remember, at one time the nickname for Stanford’s athletic teams was the Indians. Stanford is a great academic institution, but the Indians nickname was certainly not satisfactory to the p.c. police at the California school. Stanford changed its nickname to the Cardinal, the color, not plural Cardinals as the baseball St. Louis Cardinals, NFL football Arizona Cardinals or the Cardinals of the University of Louisville. My wife and I went to the recent NCAA Women’s Final Four in Dallas. We got in our seats early to see the first semifinal game between Stanford and South Carolina. In the second game the Mississippi State women shocked the basketball world by ending the 111 game winning streak of defending national champion UConn. As the Stanford women came on the court, I turned to my wife and told her she was about to witness the worst, most stupid, goofiest mascot in the history of college sports – the Tree. She agreed as she watched the Tree dance up and down the court like a ballerina.  Even better were the Stanford students wearing “Fear the Tree” shirts. I don’t think it struck much fear in the hearts of the South Carolina women’s team. While Stanford is quick to say the Tree is not the school’s “official” mascot, it is what it is. Only in California. I also agreed with my wife’s comment, “Attend Stanford and find your inner weirdness.”

The Left-Coast Never Disappoints

Through an Open Records request, Judicial Watch obtained records of a committee of the California Legislature. According to Judicial Watch, the law firm of former Obama U. S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr., will be paid $25,000 per month for 40 hours work each month. This $300,000 annual payment will not be for legal work but to provide “legal strategies regarding potential actions of the federal government (i.e. Trump Administration) that may be of concern to the State of California.” In January, California legislative leaders announced the hiring of Holder to assist them in any federal challenges to state policies such as climate change and immigration. Never mind, however, that California has major state budget problems.

No Madonna, your vulgar, tasteless speech was not “taken wildly out of context”

In defending her profane rant at the women’s march the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration, Madonna said her words were “taken wildly out of context.” If you think her speech to hundreds of thousands of women was taken out of context, I suggest you watch the video of her vulgar remarks. At least three times she yells “F… you in her speech. Despite an Associated Press report that labeled her speech, among other things, as “fiery,”  there is nothing taken out of context when the singer-actress screams “F… you”. The really, really sad part is the three times when Madonna yell “F… you”, the assembled thousands attending the women’s march cheered Madonna. I repeat. That is pretty sad.

A Mississippi Senate staff member and the State Capitol used for political fundraiser

Sen. Bob Dearing, a Natchez Democrat, was a longtime and respected senator until he was defeated by Republican Melanie Sojourner in 2011. Sojourner’s tenure in the legislature was marked by controversy, and she was also Chris McDaniel’s campaign manager during his nasty GOP primary campaign against U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran. Four years after his defeat, Dearing took on Sojourner again and won a very narrow victory. Legal battles over

Continue reading

Sept. 11, 2001 – My Day in D.C.

A horrible day we should never forget

I have a framed memento of that horrible day in our history, Sept. 11, 2001. It is a White House pass issued to me for the morning of 9/11. Prior to the changes made after that fateful day, Members of Congress were able to secure tickets for constituents to visit the White House. Even more in demand were so-called VIP passes to the home of the President of the United States. U.S. Representatives and Senators could take visitors to the White House and if you were a chief of staff for a member, which I was at the time, you could also, for a limited number of times, take people to the White House for a VIP tour. If my memory serves me, a VIP tour of the White House only allowed visitors to see one more room than a regular White House tour ticket. Of course, since it was called a VIP tour, the demand from constituents, most who considered themselves VIPs, was high. Early on the morning of 9/11 I picked up a constituent and his grandson at their hotel and drove them to the White House parking lot across the street from the U.S. Treasury building. After showing my pass and ID, the German Shepherd bomb sniffing dog and uniformed Secret Service checked my vehicle, we were allowed inside the White House gates. Unlike members of Congress who could just drop off a constitutent, a chief of staff was supposed to take the constituents inside to the White House visitor’s office. I had previously found I could avoid that step, so I dropped off my two visitors from Hattiesburg and headed back to my office. I decided to eat breakfast first. As I drove into the Rayburn House Office Building garage, by cell phone rang and I noticed it was my wife. I wondered why she was calling since she knew I had gone to the White House. I decided to eat breakfast. Kim called again and told me what had happened. I quickly walked to the office. I did not see any of the rest of the staff. I soon found them huddled in the back room, watching television showing shots of the first plane to hit the Twin Towers.

Continue reading

New Orleans is a great city, but crime is out of control

(Editor’s note: Packing up, moving, unpacking and getting my computer on line again has prevented any recent commentary from being published. I apologize to readers of the WeidieReport and I’ll do better now that I’m up and running.)

[Statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee at Lee Circle, erected in 1884 on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans. Mayor Mitch Landrieu wants to remove the statue of Lee and three others in the city. As the statue of Gen. Lee overlooks the city, he doesn't see any Union troops but it witnesses a lot of criminal violence.]
[Statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee at Lee Circle, erected in 1884 on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans. Mayor Mitch Landrieu wants to remove the statue of Lee and three others in the city. As the statue of Gen. Lee overlooks the city, he doesn’t see any Union troops but it witnesses a lot of criminal violence.]
New Orleans is truly one of America’s great cities. While I have lived the majority of my life in Mississippi and Washington, D.C., I was born in New Orleans. I graduated from both high school and college in Mississippi, but also attended high school and college in Louisiana as well. My oldest son was the first member of the Weidie family to be born outside of New Orleans (Pascagoula). In many ways, post-Katrina, New Orleans is better than ever. After the devastation of Katrina, the economy has roared back and thanks in no small part to charter schools, K-12 public education has made great strides. Tourism is booming and major conventions are booked far into the future. However, a very serious and dark threat hangs over the city. Violent crime in NOLA is out of control. Unlike some cities, the violent crime does not know the usual boundaries. In Mississippi, south Jackson and parts of west Jackson are very high crime areas as opposed to the rest of the city. Even in Washington, D.C., the worst crime is mostly confined to southeast D.C. and those areas south of the Anacostia River. In New Orleans, violent crimes frequently occur in very nice neighborhoods such as the Garden District, along beautiful St. Charles Ave., Uptown, on Canal Street and in the main areas of the French Quarter. Mayor Mitch Landrieu should worry about major crimes in NOLA instead of spending $1 million dollars to take down a statue of Robert E. Lee and even more money to take down more statues honoring other Confederate generals. Just a few months ago some of NOLA’s famous restaurant and lounges were the scene of armed robberies. The restaurants, as well as their customers, were victims. This is not to even mention the more than $5 million it cost to fix a huge sinkhole at the foot of Canal Street. Sooner or later there is going to a terrible tragedy involving numerous tourists or others attending one of the many conventions that are held in the city. NOLA is on borrowed time if something is not done to bring violent crime under control.

Continue reading