Tagged: Rep. Bennie Thompson

After the state flag, what’s next?

Rev. Al Sharpton and his clones

The battle over Mississippi’s state flag continues with apparently no end in sight. Normal political lines are somewhat blurred over the state flag controversy. Besides Democrats, the NAACP, well-known Mississippians and others usually found on the left, the Mississippi Economic Council, some Republican leaders and many other conservatives strongly feel our state should adopt a new flag. But even if Mississippi abandons its current flag with the Confederate emblem insert, will that satisfy many of those who demanded the change? Of course not. It is not difficult to come up with a long target list for those who claim to be offended by the state’s history. We see that already in New Orleans. The group that spearheaded the removal of Confederate statues in NOLA has a new targeted list that includes the statue of Andrew Jackson at Jackson Square in the French Quarter, almost a dozen more monuments, the names of  24 streets in the city, the names of two hospitals and the names of seven schools. For starters in Mississippi, we don’t even have to consider the dozens of Confederate statues on town squares or in front of country court houses. Let’s start with the vast 33,000 acre Ross Barnett Reservoir, named after one of the most racist, if not the most racist governor in our state history. Down in Hattiesburg, we have the stadium where the USM Golden Eagles play football each fall. The stadium is affectionately known as “The Rock” to USM faithful, but the official name of the facility is M.M. Roberts Stadium. An easy argument can be made that M.M. Roberts was the most racist college board member in state history. If we head northeast from Hattiesburg, we arrive at Mississippi State University.  A bust of Stephen D. Lee is in the middle of the drill field at MSU and Lee Hall is where the offices of MSU President Mark Keenum and other top administrators are located. Lee is appropriately honored at State because he was the first president of the school. Lee was also a lieutenant general in the Confederate States Army. At Ole Miss, we have already seen where previous chancellors Robert Khayat, Dan Jones and current UM head Jeffrey Vitter have bowed numerous times to sanitize the school’s history and traditions. Since South Carolina took down the Confederate flag flying at its state capital, states other than Mississippi don’t have a flag issue so the groups that want to revise history have targeted statues erected to honor Confederate generals and veterans. Does anyone really think a change in the state flag will satisfy Al Sharpton?

Bennie Thompson, Mayor Lumumba and some others should be called the “New Racists”

clones in our state like Congressman Bennie Thompson or Jackson Mayor Lumumba? Lumumba and Jackson councilman DeKeither Stamps and other activists held a press

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Race card fails in UAW’s push for union at Nissan

Landslide vote against union at Nissan is a win

for Nissan workers and also for Mississippi

On the Monday after the Saturday when workers at the Nissan plant in Canton overwhelmingly rejected the United Automobile Workers attempt to unionize, The Wall Street Journal called the vote “another humiliation” for the UAW. The editorial noted the UAW spent heavily to win the unionization vote and enlisted supporters such as Sen. Bernie Sanders, Democratic National Chairman Tom Perez and actor Danny Glover. Of course, the UAW was supported by Mississippi’s own congressman Bennie Thompson, the state NAACP and Jackson’s new mayor, Chokwe Lumumba. I had previously been told about 65 percent of the workers at the Nissan plant are black, but the WSJ said more than 80 percent of those who voted were African Americans. Of course, the UAW tried to exploit racial politics before the vote. Socialist Sen. Sanders said the UAW supporters were “connecting workers rights with civil rights.” Fortunately for the Nissan workers and future industrial development in Mississippi, playing the race card did not work for the UAW and its supporters like Bennie Thompson, longtime radical Danny Glover and Mayor Lumumba. The WSJ editorial was right on target when it said “race-baiting fell flat in Canton.” Most workers at the plant make $24-26 per hour. What do you think most of them would be making elsewhere? The WSJ also noted, and I assume the Nissan workers were also aware, a week before the vote a deceased UAW vice president teamed up with an official at Fiat-Chrysler to allegedly steal millions of dollars from a fund that was intended to train auto workers. The wife of the late UAW VP and the Fiat-Chrysler official have been indicted. UAW leaders often live high off the hog compared to the workers they represent. It is no wonder during the past 35 years the UAW’s ranks have shrunk by more than 75 percent. The Center for Union Facts also estimates during the past 10 years big labor unions have used more than $1 billion in member dues to donate to the Democratic Party and other left-wing special-interest groups. While workers at Nissan were voting 2,244 to 1,307 against joining the UAW, Toyota and Mazda announced they will spend $1.6 billion to build another assembly plant in the South. The plant is expected to have 4,000 jobs, a huge prize for whatever southern state is the winner of the competition to build the plant. That competition will be very stiff and Mississippi may be a longshot to win the plant, but one thing is very clear – if Nissan had lost the vote to the UAW, Mississippi would have zero chance to secure the economic development prize.

Correction and apology to Clarion-Ledger columnist Billy Watkins

In the August 2 WeidieReport, I commented that popular radio talk show host Bo Bounds noted a disclosure lapse at the Clarion-Ledger in Jackson. In that post I was incorrect when I wrote that veteran Clarion-Ledger columnist Billy Watkins had written several

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The Bernie and Bennie Show is coming to Mississippi

However, Congressman Thompson’s chief of staff won’t join the march – his weekends are spent in prison

I’m sure many Mississippians were thrilled earlier this week when it was announced that socialist U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders would join the state’s own Congressman Bennie Thompson to march against Nissan on March 4. Unfortunately, since March 4 is a Saturday, Thompson’s chief of staff, Lanier Avant, will be unable to join Thompson, Sanders and radical actor Danny Glover at the protest. Avant, who has been Thompson’s chief of staff for more than 15 years, spends his weekends in federal prison. According to the Justice Department, Avant was sentenced to four months in prison for failing to file an individual federal income tax return for five years. It should be noted when he pled guilty, Avant acknowledged he “willfully” failed to file the tax returns. The Washington Examiner reported for each of those five years, Avant’s salary was more than $165,000 per year. Avant filed a form which claimed he was exempt from paying federal income taxes. If that excuse were not bogus, I worked for 14 years on Capital Hill and could have avoided significant tax liability. Avant is serving his time in an unusual manner. After serving 30 days of his sentence in jail, he serves the rest of his sentence for 12 months on weekends. The sickening part of this is even after his guilty plea and sentencing, Avant is still Thompson’s chief of staff. After he completes his prison time, he will be on probation for one year and have to pay $149,962 in restitution to the Internal Revenue Service.

Why didn’t a certain newspaper report that Avant is spending his weekends in prison while he is still Bennie Thompson’s chief of staff?

Now, you may ask why isn’t the fact Avant is serving weekends in jail and is still Thompson’s chief of staff not been published in the state’s largest newspaper? The Clarion-Ledger had a report when Avant was charged with the crime and later reported

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A unanimous vote: Thank goodness it’s over

The day after the election, one of my neighbors rode by on his bike while I was walking my dogs. He shouted out just two words, “Crazy election”. Crazy election indeed. None of us have ever seen anything like the 2016 contest for President of the United States. I’m sure this is a sentiment shared by both Trump and Clinton voters. I repeat: Thank goodness it is over.

Election thoughts related to Mississippi …..

After the election, one of my dear liberal friends from Mississippi talked about the “masses” who voted for President-elect Trump. Sounds a lot to me like earlier in the campaign when Hillary Clinton referred to Trump voters as “deplorables”. Isn’t liberal elitism wonderful?

Vulgarity and corruption are not one-sided

Clarion.Ledger executive editor Sam Hall seemed to delight in the vulgarity of Donald Trump. Several times Hall “tweeted” his disgust about vulgar and tasteless statements made by Trump. There’s no question Trump frequently exhibited vulgarity and crudeness. However, I notice the liberal Hall didn’t ever tweet or appear disgusted with Clinton corruption.

I really hope Gov. Bryant and U.S. Rep. Gregg Harper’s remarks were “tongue in cheek”

Mississippi U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker served as head of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. When he took the position, I can’t think of anyone who didn’t think it was a no-win situation for Wicker. Incumbent Republicans in the U.S. Senate had far more seats

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Gov. Bryant should remind former CL reporter that he works for Bryant, not Ole Miss

Many fans of Mississippi State are very happy with every report about the NCAA investigation of Ole Miss. On the other side of the coin, Ole Miss Rebel fans are making hay about MSU’s response to the problems of State’s number one recruit, five-star rated Jeffery Simmons. A video of Simmons beating up on a woman went viral on the internet. But the issue took a political tone because social media comments by Clay Chandler, an Ole Miss grad, former reporter for The Clarion-Ledger and currently director of communications for Gov. Phil Bryant. Some may recall Mr. Chandler wrote many of the Clarion-Ledger’s stories dealing with the 9-2 vote of the college board not to renew the contract of former Ole Miss chancellor Dan Jones. On social media last March, Chandler posted that the college board “fired a cancer patient.” Chandler, the son of former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice David Chandler, didn’t learn his lesson after his previous posts on social media. After Mississippi State finally made its decision about football star Simmons, Chandler went on a very critical Twitter rant about MSU’s decision. That might be expected of an Ole Miss alumnus, but it was very poor judgement on the part of a key member of Gov. Bryant’s staff. After a statewide furor, Chandler deleted his tasteless tweets about the Jeffrey Simmons matter. None the less, it had to be huge embarrassment for Gov. Bryant that one of his top staff members used such incredibly poor judgement. Bryant has a lot major contributors and supporters who are Mississippi State alumni. I’m confident that MSU President Mark Keenum and other State officials let Gov. Bryant know that Chandler’s comments were not appreciated and were certainly unprofessional by a member of Bryant’s staff.

What grade does MSU get for handling the Simmons matter?

After a long decision process, MSU announced that Simmons will be allowed to enroll in school and participate in football if certain conditions are met. State has been roundly criticized by most of the national media. Did State make a mistake in the final determination the university made regarding Simmons? You will hear very strong opinions on both sides of the matter. In my opinion, it is hard to fault the decision because it was MSU that gathered all the facts in the Simmons case before allowing his enrollment. However, a couple of assumptions seem very reasonable. If Simmons meets all other conditions of his admittance to State, he will only miss the season opener against South Alabama. Give me a break. Even if Simmons is an impact player in the SEC like many say he will be, Simmons and many other starters could miss the South Alabama game and the Bulldogs will still win. In MSU’s official statement on the Simmon’s decision, it said that Simmons was waiting resolution on misdemeanor charges where, “in an effort to break up a domestic fight between his sister and another adult woman, he used physical force against one of those involved in the altercation.” I agree Simmons deserves a second chance, but in the video, Simmons is shown pounding the woman who is already on the  ground. I also doubt if the statement was the product of State’s sports information department. I’m sure it was written and approved at the highest level of the president’s office.

What one word best describes the administration of Jackson Mayor Tony Yarber?  ROTTEN

Congressman Thompson should worry about his constituents, not the state flag

It was not really a surprise recently to see the front page story in the Clarion.Ledger entitled, “Mississippians rally against the state flag.” A picture of the rally on Capitol Hill in Washington showed U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson speaking at the rally. Thompson, the senior member of the Mississippi’s delegation in the House, was elected in 1993. Most of his congressional district includes the Mississippi Delta, the poorest area of a poor state. Since he was elected almost 25 years ago, have the lives of his Delta constituents improved? The answer in a resounding “No.”