Tagged: Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith

Sen. Hyde-Smith hands Chris McDaniel a legitimate campaign gift

National debt is now over $21.1 trillion ($21,110,000,000,000) and rapidly growing

On May 17 the U.S. Senate rejected a resolution by Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky. The vote was 21-76, with three senators not voting, against Paul’s Concurrent Resolution 76 to provide spending cuts to the Fiscal Year 2019 budget and future budget levels for fiscal years 2000 to 2028. The vote has been call symbolic, meaningless, political and nothing less than a show vote. Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi called Paul’s measure a “theatric ” vote. Paul’s resolution was dubbed the “Penny Plan” because it called for a reduction of all federal spending by one percent over five years. Pro Hyde-Smith writers or anti-Chris McDaniel writers, one of Hyde Smith’s November opponents, quickly defended her vote. Actually, being pro-Hyde-Smith or anti-McDaniel are probably one in the same. Alan Lange’s Y’all Politics questioned whether the “Penny Plan” was the “real thing” or a “show vote.” Y’all Politics printed Hyde-Smith’s statement defending her vote.  Respected columnist Sid Salter wrote an even stronger response. Salter said Resolution 76 was more “political theatrics” than an “honest fiscal policy proposal.” I’ll agree the “Penny Plan” was a political vote under any circumstances. But since Sen. Hyde-Smith was appointed to replace Sen. Thad Cochran who retired for health reasons, she must now win a special election this November for the remainder of Cochran’s term. Apart from being a political vote, the bottom line is the “Penny Plan” was a vote to CUT federal spending.

Reducing federal spending is very important to Americans and future generations of Americans. The federal debt is now over $21.1 trillion dollars. That’s $21,110, 000,000,000 and climbing. For the current fiscal year, you and other American taxpayers, are estimated to pay total interest payments of $310 billion. These annual

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Others can share blame with political boy wonder for Hyde-Smith campaign foul up

When Gov. Phil Bryant appointed Cindy Hyde-Smith to the U.S. Senate to fill the remaining term of Sen. Thad Cochran until this November’s special election, I received a call from a politically savvy friend. My friend held Hyde-Smith in high regard but was worried Josh Gregory and his partner’s firm, Frontier Strategies, were signed up her to direct her campaign. Frontier also directed Cochran’s 2014 campaign when Cochran narrowly defeated Republican primary challenger Chris McDaniel of Jones County. At one time, Gregory was regarded as sort of a boy wonder of political operatives in Mississippi. He did campaign work for former Gov. Haley Barbour and drove the political train that elected Bryant as lieutenant governor and then to two terms as governor. Gregory reportedly has also signed on to direct Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann’s 2019 race to succeed Tate Reeves as lieutenant governor. Gregory’s reputation took a hit this week when Hyde-Smith sent out a campaign fundraising letter saying she had the support of President Trump and Vice President Pence. She might and probably will eventually receive the endorsement of Trump, but when the letter was sent out, she had not.

On Tuesday I received two electronic versions of Hyde-Smith’s letter. It wasn’t much later in the day that Geoff Pender, political editor for The Jackson Clarion-Ledger wrote that while Hyde-Smith claimed she was supported by Trump, to date Trump and Pence had not endorsed her candidacy. Of course, Gregory can share the blame for this campaign foul-up with others. In Pender’s story, Jordan Russell, Hyde-Smith’s campaign manager, said the letter was a “drafting error” generated by an outside vendor hired by the campaign. What a pathetic response. I don’t care what outside vendor drafted the letter. As campaign

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