Tagged: Sid Salter

Sen. Hyde-Smith hands Chris McDaniel a legitimate campaign gift

National debt is now over $21.1 trillion ($21,110,000,000,000) and rapidly growing

On May 17 the U.S. Senate rejected a resolution by Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky. The vote was 21-76, with three senators not voting, against Paul’s Concurrent Resolution 76 to provide spending cuts to the Fiscal Year 2019 budget and future budget levels for fiscal years 2000 to 2028. The vote has been call symbolic, meaningless, political and nothing less than a show vote. Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi called Paul’s measure a “theatric ” vote. Paul’s resolution was dubbed the “Penny Plan” because it called for a reduction of all federal spending by one percent over five years. Pro Hyde-Smith writers or anti-Chris McDaniel writers, one of Hyde Smith’s November opponents, quickly defended her vote. Actually, being pro-Hyde-Smith or anti-McDaniel are probably one in the same. Alan Lange’s Y’all Politics questioned whether the “Penny Plan” was the “real thing” or a “show vote.” Y’all Politics printed Hyde-Smith’s statement defending her vote.  Respected columnist Sid Salter wrote an even stronger response. Salter said Resolution 76 was more “political theatrics” than an “honest fiscal policy proposal.” I’ll agree the “Penny Plan” was a political vote under any circumstances. But since Sen. Hyde-Smith was appointed to replace Sen. Thad Cochran who retired for health reasons, she must now win a special election this November for the remainder of Cochran’s term. Apart from being a political vote, the bottom line is the “Penny Plan” was a vote to CUT federal spending.

Reducing federal spending is very important to Americans and future generations of Americans. The federal debt is now over $21.1 trillion dollars. That’s $21,110, 000,000,000 and climbing. For the current fiscal year, you and other American taxpayers, are estimated to pay total interest payments of $310 billion. These annual

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Bill Minor, R.I.P.

More than 30 years ago, I was editor and publisher of a weekly newspaper on the Gulf Coast that was owned by Gannett. A prominent citizen and former mayor, who had lost his re-election bid, died. I had to write the customary obituary editorial for the late mayor. I was never his fan. He was often nasty and mostly rude to the city aldermen that served with him. I decided not to be a hypocrite and the best I could say in my editorial was that he was a man who very much cared for the city of Ocean Springs. Earlier this week I recalled the mayor when I learned Bill Minor had passed at the age of 93. I was sad to hear of his death, and there is no question Minor made many contributions to Mississippi during his long career. After someone texted me Tuesday morning about Minor’s death, I went to the Clarion-Ledger online edition where I saw the headline on reporter Jerry Mitchell’s story. The headline was, “Bill Minor remembered as a model for journalists.” From my perspective, I would never consider Minor as a “model for journalists.” His left-wing politics was one thing, but I objected far more to his liberal bias and his frequent carelessness with the facts. During my days as an editor and syndicated political columnist, I was once on a panel at Ole Miss with Minor, the late Norma Fields of the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, and a TV anchor from Jackson. Every member of the panel was asked who they were supporting in the race for governor that was taking place at the time. I went last, but Minor and the two other journalists righteously wrapped themselves in a self-serving cloak of objective journalism. They refused to tell the students who they would vote for in the upcoming election. When it was my time to answer, I told the students not only would I tell them the name of the candidate for whom I would vote, I proceeded to tell them, correctly, who each of the other journalists supported. An outraged Minor then chased me across campus after the panel ended and demanded to know why I answered how I did.

A bitter man

Following another speaking appearance before a large group of students at Ole Miss, I was approached by a young black student. She told me she had heard Minor speak a few weeks

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Journalist, columnist is also a state employee; and the “First Disgrace of 2017 Award”

Pettus column – “New Yuletide lyrics to mark Trump regime” – Over the line and tasteless

Gary Pettus is a regular contributing columnist for the Jackson Clarion-Ledger. For many years, Pettus was a member of the newspaper’s staff. At the end of his Clarion-Ledger columns, it notes “Gary Pettus is a Jackson-based journalist and contributing columnist.” It should also be noted Pettus is a state employee and works in the public affairs office at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Why is this relevant? On Dec. 19, Pettus wrote a column entitled, “New Yuletide lyrics to mark Trump regime.” He suggests revised lyrics for a very popular Christmas season song. Pettus’ revision is entitled, “It’s the Most Trumper-ful Time of the Year.” Here are just a few of the comment Pettus labeled as the “new code” for president-elect Trump: “There’ll be few books for learning, Cause most will be burning – good times for bigots – Muslims they’re jailing, Latinos expelling – great times for the sociopath. – It’s beginning to look just like the Third Reich – A swastika there and here – Christians kissing a tyrant’s rear, Burning churches all aglow – It’s going to look like Nagasaki August of ’45 – The prettiest sight to behold is not traffic on the road, Cause no one is left alive.” The “lyrics” of the Pettus column go on with more lack of taste, but I think you get the idea about the column. Hillary Clinton calling Trump supporters “deplorables” is mild compared to Pettus tossing out terms like book burners, bigots and writing about swastikas and the Third Reich. Because the anti-Trump column crosses the line, it is logical to ask other questions. Why was the column published in the Clarion-Ledger in the first place? The obvious answer is that the executive editor of the newspaper, Sam Hall, is a Democrat partisan. Unlike most editors, Hall probably didn’t bat an eye if he reviewed the column by Pettus. Pettus has taken other cheap shots at president-elect Trump. Perhaps even more significant is he has taken similar shots at Gov. Phil Bryant and Republicans in general. Reminder: Seven of the eight statewide officials in our state are Republicans and the GOP has solid majorities in both the state Senate and House. Another reminder: The Senate and House make appropriations for state government and Gov. Bryant signs the appropriation bills.

Biting the hand that feeds you in a tasteless way

The next obvious question is if I raise an issue about Pettus being a state employee, what about Charles Mitchell and Sid Salter, two other former journalists who are state

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Clarion-Ledger versus Mississippi State officials (plus burning football questions for the Dawgs and Rebels)

No, State did not name a new AD on Oct. 18

Mike Bonner is the Jackson Clarion-Ledger’s beat reporter for Mississippi State athletics.  I think Bonner does a darn good job. Of course, partisans of MSU, Ole Miss or any other school never think beat reporters are as positive as they should be towards their team. On Wednesday, Oct. 12, Bonner, citing unnamed sources, reported Bulldog head baseball coach John Cohen would be named athletic director the next week, on Oct. 18, to replace Scott Stricklin who has moved on to be AD for the Florida Gators. MSU officials were very upset with the report and the Clarion-Ledger. President Mark Keenum issued a very strong statement criticizing Bonner and the newspaper. MSU spokesman Sid Salter, a former Clarion-Ledger staff member himself and political columnist, quickly went on the state’s leading sports talk radio show to deny Bonner’s report that a decision had been made. Rick Cleveland is also a former Clarion-Ledger sports editor and columnist. Cleveland, who I think is one of the best, if not the best ever Mississippi sports columnist, promptly wrote about Bonner’s controversial report in his syndicated column. He also wrote that Hugh Kellenberger, the newspaper’s sports editor, backed Bonner.

The bottom line:

Should Bonner have contacted Dr. Keenum for a comment before his news article stating baseball coach John Cohen would be named athletic director on Tuesday, Oct. 18? Absolutely. There is a difference between a request for comment in

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“Clarion-Ledger Seems Obsessed with Changing State Flag”

One of the best “Letters to the Editor” about the very controversial issue of changing the state flag appeared in Tuesday’s Clarion-Ledger and was written by Bill Harvey of Jackson. The letter was headlined, “Clarion-Ledger seems obsessed with changing the state flag.” I certainly agree with the writer on that point. While I know anyone in favor of changing the state flag or opposing the change will not be swayed by anything Harvey or I write, I would suggest you read Harvey’s letter. I very much agree with his comments. There is another point I would like to make. Because of the Clarion-Ledger’s constant advocacy in favor of a new state flag and the  newspaper’s endless drum-beating on this issue, I feel it has only increased the racial divide in our state.

Another liberal jumps on board with Hosemann’s election reforms

In my most recent commentary of March 9, I questioned if Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann’s election reform legislation should be supported by conservatives if it were endorsed by the very liberal American Civil Liberties Union and left-wing MSU professor Dr. Marty Wiseman. Alice Skelton quickly responded with the following on her Facebook page: “Maybe good policies are neither Republican or Democrat. Hosemann is proving to be a good public servant to ALL MISSISSIPPIANS. Signed a proud liberal Democrat.” It should be noted Ms. Skelton is a former executive director of the Mississippi Democrat Party. I met her in Washington, D.C. many years ago through a mutual friend of both of us. She is a very nice lady but also very liberal in her political views, as she noted in her

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